Archive for January, 2008

>T is for Trespass

January 31, 2008

>

Information on the Sue Grafton mystery that confronts the evil of elder abuse was sent from a NASGA member saying:
“The people who change history are the artists – a call for novels, art, cartoons, poetry, and music as effective weapons of truth.”
This appears to be a mystery that guardianship and conservatorship victims or their families can identify with.
tres•pass \’tres-p s\ n: a transgression of law involving one’s obligations to God or to one’s neighbor; a violation of moral law; an offense; a sin –Webster’s New International Dictionary (second edition, unabridged)

In what may be her most unsettling novel to date, Sue Grafton’s T is for Trespass is also her most direct confrontation with the forces of evil. Beginning slowly with the day-to-day life of a private eye, Grafton suddenly shifts from the perspective of Kinsey Millhone to that of Solana Rojas, introducing listeners to a chilling sociopath. Rojas is not her birth name. It is an identity she cunningly stole, an identity that gives her access to private care-giving jobs. The true horror of this novel builds with excruciating tension as the listener foresees the awfulness that lies ahead. The wrenching suspense lies in whether Kinsey Millhone will realize what is happening in time to intervene. T is for Trespass–dealing with issues of identity theft, elder abuse, betrayal of trust, and the breakdown in the institutions charged with caring for the weak and the dependent–targets an all-too-real rip in the social fabric. Grafton takes us into far darker territory than she has ever traversed, leaving us with a true sense of the horror embedded in the seeming ordinariness of the world we think we know. The result is terrifying.
Source: Sue Grafton – Reviews

From Book Reporter: As silent and lethal as undetectable poison, Solana begins to set the stage for the solitary Gus’s demise. Through lies, deception, deliberately confusing times of day and drugging his food, he soon appears to have dementia and memory loss to friends who visit. His distant niece who trusts Solana enables her to take more responsibility with his day-to-day needs.

Kinsey begins to suspect that something is wrong when Gus’s personality changes and starts to look for evidence of wrongdoing. Solana’s sociopathic behavior and paranoia soon turn on Kinsey, and she finds herself the object of Solana’s abuse.

As current as today’s headlines, Sue Grafton tackles the problems of identity theft and elder abuse in an exciting new novel — the 20th in her legendary alphabet series.T IS FOR TRESPASS is more than a good mystery; it is an alert to the dangers that await us all if we are not aware of how easy it is for an unscrupulous person to insinuate themselves into a family member’s life.

Read an excerpt from the book: T is for Trespass

More from other readers: Amazon Customer Reviews

Advertisements

T is for Trespass

January 31, 2008
Information on the Sue Grafton mystery that confronts the evil of elder abuse was sent from a NASGA member saying:
“The people who change history are the artists – a call for novels, art, cartoons, poetry, and music as effective weapons of truth.”
This appears to be a mystery that guardianship and conservatorship victims or their families can identify with.
tres•pass \’tres-p s\ n: a transgression of law involving one’s obligations to God or to one’s neighbor; a violation of moral law; an offense; a sin –Webster’s New International Dictionary (second edition, unabridged)

In what may be her most unsettling novel to date, Sue Grafton’s T is for Trespass is also her most direct confrontation with the forces of evil. Beginning slowly with the day-to-day life of a private eye, Grafton suddenly shifts from the perspective of Kinsey Millhone to that of Solana Rojas, introducing listeners to a chilling sociopath. Rojas is not her birth name. It is an identity she cunningly stole, an identity that gives her access to private care-giving jobs. The true horror of this novel builds with excruciating tension as the listener foresees the awfulness that lies ahead. The wrenching suspense lies in whether Kinsey Millhone will realize what is happening in time to intervene. T is for Trespass–dealing with issues of identity theft, elder abuse, betrayal of trust, and the breakdown in the institutions charged with caring for the weak and the dependent–targets an all-too-real rip in the social fabric. Grafton takes us into far darker territory than she has ever traversed, leaving us with a true sense of the horror embedded in the seeming ordinariness of the world we think we know. The result is terrifying.
Source: Sue Grafton – Reviews

From Book Reporter: As silent and lethal as undetectable poison, Solana begins to set the stage for the solitary Gus’s demise. Through lies, deception, deliberately confusing times of day and drugging his food, he soon appears to have dementia and memory loss to friends who visit. His distant niece who trusts Solana enables her to take more responsibility with his day-to-day needs.

Kinsey begins to suspect that something is wrong when Gus’s personality changes and starts to look for evidence of wrongdoing. Solana’s sociopathic behavior and paranoia soon turn on Kinsey, and she finds herself the object of Solana’s abuse.

As current as today’s headlines, Sue Grafton tackles the problems of identity theft and elder abuse in an exciting new novel — the 20th in her legendary alphabet series.T IS FOR TRESPASS is more than a good mystery; it is an alert to the dangers that await us all if we are not aware of how easy it is for an unscrupulous person to insinuate themselves into a family member’s life.

Read an excerpt from the book: T is for Trespass

More from other readers: Amazon Customer Reviews

T is for Trespass

January 31, 2008
Information on the Sue Grafton mystery that confronts the evil of elder abuse was sent from a NASGA member saying:
“The people who change history are the artists – a call for novels, art, cartoons, poetry, and music as effective weapons of truth.”
This appears to be a mystery that guardianship and conservatorship victims or their families can identify with.
tres•pass \’tres-p s\ n: a transgression of law involving one’s obligations to God or to one’s neighbor; a violation of moral law; an offense; a sin –Webster’s New International Dictionary (second edition, unabridged)

In what may be her most unsettling novel to date, Sue Grafton’s T is for Trespass is also her most direct confrontation with the forces of evil. Beginning slowly with the day-to-day life of a private eye, Grafton suddenly shifts from the perspective of Kinsey Millhone to that of Solana Rojas, introducing listeners to a chilling sociopath. Rojas is not her birth name. It is an identity she cunningly stole, an identity that gives her access to private care-giving jobs. The true horror of this novel builds with excruciating tension as the listener foresees the awfulness that lies ahead. The wrenching suspense lies in whether Kinsey Millhone will realize what is happening in time to intervene. T is for Trespass–dealing with issues of identity theft, elder abuse, betrayal of trust, and the breakdown in the institutions charged with caring for the weak and the dependent–targets an all-too-real rip in the social fabric. Grafton takes us into far darker territory than she has ever traversed, leaving us with a true sense of the horror embedded in the seeming ordinariness of the world we think we know. The result is terrifying.
Source: Sue Grafton – Reviews

From Book Reporter: As silent and lethal as undetectable poison, Solana begins to set the stage for the solitary Gus’s demise. Through lies, deception, deliberately confusing times of day and drugging his food, he soon appears to have dementia and memory loss to friends who visit. His distant niece who trusts Solana enables her to take more responsibility with his day-to-day needs.

Kinsey begins to suspect that something is wrong when Gus’s personality changes and starts to look for evidence of wrongdoing. Solana’s sociopathic behavior and paranoia soon turn on Kinsey, and she finds herself the object of Solana’s abuse.

As current as today’s headlines, Sue Grafton tackles the problems of identity theft and elder abuse in an exciting new novel — the 20th in her legendary alphabet series.T IS FOR TRESPASS is more than a good mystery; it is an alert to the dangers that await us all if we are not aware of how easy it is for an unscrupulous person to insinuate themselves into a family member’s life.

Read an excerpt from the book: T is for Trespass

More from other readers: Amazon Customer Reviews

An Alleged Kidnapping

January 30, 2008
Delores Forste is the daughter who was accused of kidnapping her own mother.
Emma France is a 95 year old woman that claims a government official in Jasper County Missouri charged that she was kidnapped by her 67 year old daughter. An appeal made by Emma France to free her daughter Delores Forste was made on a video:

http://www.youtube.com/v/7fUD-Yd0iLc&hl=en

It was reported that Emma was represented by a court-appointed counsel, otherwise known as an guardian ad litem, but no testimony was offered suggesting that Emma was capable of taking care of her own affairs. Instead the judge in what appeared to be a very short probate trial signed away her free will. France challenged the charges against her daughter. She said Forste is not guilty of financial exploitation or kidnapping. She said she wanted to go to California and to get out of Jasper County after she was hospitalized and made a ward of the public administrator. She said both actions were taken against her will.

More on this case was reported in the Joplin Independent and the Joplin Globe:

Emma France says daughter is innocent

Emma France makes video appeal to free daughter

Woman accused of kidnapping her mother speaks out

Preliminary hearing set for woman charged with kidnapping mother

Special prosecutor tabbed in case of woman who moved mother

Woman who ‘kidnapped’ mother faces extradition hearing

Woman, charged with kidnapping mother, released on bond

It was also reported that the fees charged by a Jasper County public administrator, are many times higher than those levied by her predecessor. They also are many times higher than those levied by other public administrators in three similarly-sized Missouri counties. The daughter is quoted as saying:
“I really believe this is all about money.”

Source: Jasper County public administrator defends fees

An Alleged Kidnapping

January 30, 2008
Delores Forste is the daughter who was accused of kidnapping her own mother.
Emma France is a 95 year old woman that claims a government official in Jasper County Missouri charged that she was kidnapped by her 67 year old daughter. An appeal made by Emma France to free her daughter Delores Forste was made on a video:

It was reported that Emma was represented by a court-appointed counsel, otherwise known as an guardian ad litem, but no testimony was offered suggesting that Emma was capable of taking care of her own affairs. Instead the judge in what appeared to be a very short probate trial signed away her free will. France challenged the charges against her daughter. She said Forste is not guilty of financial exploitation or kidnapping. She said she wanted to go to California and to get out of Jasper County after she was hospitalized and made a ward of the public administrator. She said both actions were taken against her will.

More on this case was reported in the Joplin Independent and the Joplin Globe:

Emma France says daughter is innocent

Emma France makes video appeal to free daughter

Woman accused of kidnapping her mother speaks out

Preliminary hearing set for woman charged with kidnapping mother

Special prosecutor tabbed in case of woman who moved mother

Woman who ‘kidnapped’ mother faces extradition hearing

Woman, charged with kidnapping mother, released on bond

It was also reported that the fees charged by a Jasper County public administrator, are many times higher than those levied by her predecessor. They also are many times higher than those levied by other public administrators in three similarly-sized Missouri counties. The daughter is quoted as saying:
“I really believe this is all about money.”

Source: Jasper County public administrator defends fees

An Alleged Kidnapping

January 30, 2008
Delores Forste is the daughter who was accused of kidnapping her own mother.
Emma France is a 95 year old woman that claims a government official in Jasper County Missouri charged that she was kidnapped by her 67 year old daughter. An appeal made by Emma France to free her daughter Delores Forste was made on a video:

It was reported that Emma was represented by a court-appointed counsel, otherwise known as an guardian ad litem, but no testimony was offered suggesting that Emma was capable of taking care of her own affairs. Instead the judge in what appeared to be a very short probate trial signed away her free will. France challenged the charges against her daughter. She said Forste is not guilty of financial exploitation or kidnapping. She said she wanted to go to California and to get out of Jasper County after she was hospitalized and made a ward of the public administrator. She said both actions were taken against her will.

More on this case was reported in the Joplin Independent and the Joplin Globe:

Emma France says daughter is innocent

Emma France makes video appeal to free daughter

Woman accused of kidnapping her mother speaks out

Preliminary hearing set for woman charged with kidnapping mother

Special prosecutor tabbed in case of woman who moved mother

Woman who ‘kidnapped’ mother faces extradition hearing

Woman, charged with kidnapping mother, released on bond

It was also reported that the fees charged by a Jasper County public administrator, are many times higher than those levied by her predecessor. They also are many times higher than those levied by other public administrators in three similarly-sized Missouri counties. The daughter is quoted as saying:
“I really believe this is all about money.”

Source: Jasper County public administrator defends fees

Guardianship Legislation

January 30, 2008
According to a State Adult Guardianship Legislation report, about 13 states passed a total of 16 adult guardianship bills last year.

The report includes – Connecticut bolstering procedures for appointment and appeal. Washington, Arkansas and Nevada creating or strengthening a public guardianship program.

Other states in the report include Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Illinois, Idaho, Kentucky, Minnesota, Rhode Island and Virginia.

Legislation at a glance:

California’s Omnibus Act was also mentioned in the report. “In 2006, in response to a series of reports on the state’s adult guardianship system (called “conservatorship” in California), the legislature passed an Omnibus Act, which was “a landmark package of bills to overhaul California’s troubled conservatorship system. That legislation [was] designed to remedy alarming deficiencies in California’s conservatorship system that had led to the abuses of California’s elderly and most vulnerable” (Bill Summary, Legislative Analysis, Leora Gershenzon). While the Act was moving through the legislature, the Chief Justice appointed a Probate Conservatorship Task Force to make recommendations for reform. The Task Force released recommendations, several of which were included in AB 1727, which also makes a number of technical and other clarifying amendments to last year’s Act.”

After the good news of California’s much needed reform, it was reported that Schwarzenegger vetoed the funding. “Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger Friday signed into law a $145 billion budget for FY 2007-2008, but not before using his line-item veto power to cut $700 million, including $17.377 million that would have implemented conservatorship reforms approved by lawmakers last year.”

Source: Schwarzenegger Vetoes Conservatorship Reform Funding

The Los Angeles Times reported: “When yacht owners are preferred over the aged and homeless, the bottom line is we’ve sunk too low.”

Source: Schwarzenegger’s bad budget cuts

In reality, it is not clear how any of the new legislation will help victims of guardianship and conservatorship abuse. NASGA believes that much more is needed.

Reports from the Commission on Law and Aging, American Bar Association:
State Adult Guardianship Legislation: Directions of Reform – 2007
State Adult Guardianship Legislation: Directions of Reform 2006

Guardianship Legislation

January 30, 2008
According to a State Adult Guardianship Legislation report, about 13 states passed a total of 16 adult guardianship bills last year.

The report includes – Connecticut bolstering procedures for appointment and appeal. Washington, Arkansas and Nevada creating or strengthening a public guardianship program.

Other states in the report include Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Illinois, Idaho, Kentucky, Minnesota, Rhode Island and Virginia.

Legislation at a glance:

California’s Omnibus Act was also mentioned in the report. “In 2006, in response to a series of reports on the state’s adult guardianship system (called “conservatorship” in California), the legislature passed an Omnibus Act, which was “a landmark package of bills to overhaul California’s troubled conservatorship system. That legislation [was] designed to remedy alarming deficiencies in California’s conservatorship system that had led to the abuses of California’s elderly and most vulnerable” (Bill Summary, Legislative Analysis, Leora Gershenzon). While the Act was moving through the legislature, the Chief Justice appointed a Probate Conservatorship Task Force to make recommendations for reform. The Task Force released recommendations, several of which were included in AB 1727, which also makes a number of technical and other clarifying amendments to last year’s Act.”

After the good news of California’s much needed reform, it was reported that Schwarzenegger vetoed the funding. “Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger Friday signed into law a $145 billion budget for FY 2007-2008, but not before using his line-item veto power to cut $700 million, including $17.377 million that would have implemented conservatorship reforms approved by lawmakers last year.”

Source: Schwarzenegger Vetoes Conservatorship Reform Funding

The Los Angeles Times reported: “When yacht owners are preferred over the aged and homeless, the bottom line is we’ve sunk too low.”

Source: Schwarzenegger’s bad budget cuts

In reality, it is not clear how any of the new legislation will help victims of guardianship and conservatorship abuse. NASGA believes that much more is needed.

Reports from the Commission on Law and Aging, American Bar Association:
State Adult Guardianship Legislation: Directions of Reform – 2007
State Adult Guardianship Legislation: Directions of Reform 2006

Guardianship Legislation

January 30, 2008
According to a State Adult Guardianship Legislation report, about 13 states passed a total of 16 adult guardianship bills last year.

The report includes – Connecticut bolstering procedures for appointment and appeal. Washington, Arkansas and Nevada creating or strengthening a public guardianship program.

Other states in the report include Arizona, California, District of Columbia, Illinois, Idaho, Kentucky, Minnesota, Rhode Island and Virginia.

Legislation at a glance:

California’s Omnibus Act was also mentioned in the report. “In 2006, in response to a series of reports on the state’s adult guardianship system (called “conservatorship” in California), the legislature passed an Omnibus Act, which was “a landmark package of bills to overhaul California’s troubled conservatorship system. That legislation [was] designed to remedy alarming deficiencies in California’s conservatorship system that had led to the abuses of California’s elderly and most vulnerable” (Bill Summary, Legislative Analysis, Leora Gershenzon). While the Act was moving through the legislature, the Chief Justice appointed a Probate Conservatorship Task Force to make recommendations for reform. The Task Force released recommendations, several of which were included in AB 1727, which also makes a number of technical and other clarifying amendments to last year’s Act.”

After the good news of California’s much needed reform, it was reported that Schwarzenegger vetoed the funding. “Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger Friday signed into law a $145 billion budget for FY 2007-2008, but not before using his line-item veto power to cut $700 million, including $17.377 million that would have implemented conservatorship reforms approved by lawmakers last year.”

Source: Schwarzenegger Vetoes Conservatorship Reform Funding

The Los Angeles Times reported: “When yacht owners are preferred over the aged and homeless, the bottom line is we’ve sunk too low.”

Source: Schwarzenegger’s bad budget cuts

In reality, it is not clear how any of the new legislation will help victims of guardianship and conservatorship abuse. NASGA believes that much more is needed.

Reports from the Commission on Law and Aging, American Bar Association:
State Adult Guardianship Legislation: Directions of Reform – 2007
State Adult Guardianship Legislation: Directions of Reform 2006

>Plea for Justice

January 28, 2008

>

Dr. Robert Sarhan’s plea for justice is circulating the Internet.
According to Dr. Sarhan, here is the problem:

Yvonne Sarhan, never wanted nor requested a guardian, this was forced against her will. Yvonne Sarhan requested orally and in writing to the judge, that if she had to have a guardian she wanted her son, Robert Sarhan. Yvonne Sarhan was competent at the time of her being adjudicated incapacitated on August 5, 2003. She was ruled competent by the Court appointed psychiatrist on March 10, 2004. Another doctor, also a board certified neurologist, evaluated Yvonne Sarhan and both agreed that she was competent and had good judgment and insight about her financial and personal life.

For more information see:
Habeas Corpus (PDF)

Response to Strike Motion to Dismiss Writ of Habeas Corpus Petition (PDF)

Dr. Sarhan’s plea is but one of many. A forced guardianship against the will of an “alleged incapacitated person” is an epidemic practice throughout the United States. Many times these proceedings are unnecessary and then become abusive.

Sadly, complaints such as this one seem to be surfacing more and more.

Is anybody listening?