Archive for the ‘Social Security’ Category

Representative Payee

September 27, 2009

When I took over the finances for my mother, I shouldn’t have been surprised that she didn’t have her Social Security payment directly deposited into her checking account. My parents grew up during the unsettling times of the Depression with high unemployment and bank failures.

Representative payee
Many elderly beneficiaries who cannot manage or direct the management of his or her money have a representative payee. A representative payee is a person who has legal authority to receive a cash benefit check from the Social Security Administration (SSA) on behalf of the recipient.

A representative payee’s authority is limited to receiving and managing benefits from the SSA. The payee has no legal authority to manage non-Social Security income or medical matters. A power of attorney or legal guardianship is not recognized by the Treasury Department for the purposes of negotiating federal payments, including Social Security checks. Therefore, they too must apply to be appointed the representative payee.

You should contact the SSA office nearest you to apply to be a payee. You must then submit an application — form SSA-11-BK in SSA-speak — and request to be selected as payee. You must also have documents to prove your identity. SSA requires that the payee application be completed in a face-to-face interview, with certain exceptions.

Here are some of the duties that are required from a representative payee:

Determine the beneficiary’s needs and use his or her payments to meet those needs.

Save any money left after meeting the beneficiary’s current needs in an interest bearing account or savings bonds for the beneficiary’s future needs.

Report any changes or events which could affect the beneficiary’s eligibility for benefits or payment amount.

Keep records of all payments received and how they are spent and/or saved.

Provide benefit information to social service agencies or medical facilities that serve the beneficiary.

Help the beneficiary get medical treatment when necessary.

Notify SSA of any changes in your (the payee’s) circumstances that would affect your performance or continuing as payee.

Complete written reports accounting for the use of funds once a year; and

Return any payments to which the beneficiary is not entitled to SSA.

You may not collect a fee for acting as a representative payee unless you are a qualified organizational payee who has applied and been approved in writing by the SSA to collect a fee.

If this all seems a little overwhelming, you may contact the Social Security Administration toll free at (800) 772-1213 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday. Contact your local SSA office between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on business days, or visit their Web site http://www.socialsecurity.gov. You may also request SSA Publication No. 05-10076, “A Guide for Representative Payees.”

Full Article and Source:
Helping a Parent Through the Social Security Maze

Note: Debbie Haws is a caregiver and guardian of a parent with dementia. Her experiences and heartfelt journeys have created a passion for increasing awareness of issues faced by Seniors and their families.

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Booted From Marine Corps

August 8, 2009
At age 8, Josh Fry was diagnosed with autism.

When Fry turned 18 in 2006, he was deemed unable to make major decisions for himself by the California courts. The federal government approved his disability and made Social Security payments to help provide for his care.

But in 2008, no one blinked when a Marine recruiter picked up Fry from a group home for mentally ill adults and took him to the Costa Mesa recruiting substation. Nine days later, Fry was standing on the yellow footprints.

On July 20, 2009 — after 18 months in the Corps, 12 of them confined in the brig — Pvt. Josh Fry was court-martialed for fraudulent enlistment, unauthorized absence and possession of child pornography. He was sentenced to time served plus three years probation, tossed from the Corps with a bad-conduct discharge and ordered to register as a sex offender.

Left unexplained in the whole mess, however, is how a man such as Fry could be recruited into the Marine Corps in the first place, make it through boot camp and get sent on to infantry training during war time.

Full Article and Source:
Autistic Marine booted from the Corps

See also:
Marine Recruiter Ignores Conservatorship

Special Needs Trusts Workshop

July 29, 2009
A workshop on guardianship and special needs trusts for individuals with disabilities will be held on August 18, 2009 at United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Birmingham.

A track for care coordinators, families, and professionals will run from 1 – 4 pm. For families unable to attend the afternoon session, a track for individuals with disabilities as well as families will be held from 5 – 7 pm.

Topics for the workshop include discussion and examination of guardianship issues, financial planning, resource limitations, Medicaid, SSI, SSID, special needs trusts, and the Alabama Family Trust.

To register for the workshop contact Anita Davidson by e-mail at akdavidson@adap.ua.edu

or call 205-348-4928.

Source:
Workshop on guardianship and special needs trusts in Birmingham

>Special Needs Trusts Workshop

July 29, 2009

>

A workshop on guardianship and special needs trusts for individuals with disabilities will be held on August 18, 2009 at United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Birmingham.

A track for care coordinators, families, and professionals will run from 1 – 4 pm. For families unable to attend the afternoon session, a track for individuals with disabilities as well as families will be held from 5 – 7 pm.

Topics for the workshop include discussion and examination of guardianship issues, financial planning, resource limitations, Medicaid, SSI, SSID, special needs trusts, and the Alabama Family Trust.

To register for the workshop contact Anita Davidson by e-mail at akdavidson@adap.ua.edu

or call 205-348-4928.

Source:
Workshop on guardianship and special needs trusts in Birmingham

Chamber of Commerce for Persons with Disabilities

June 28, 2009
Pete Schoemann wants to build a bridge between the business and disabled communities.

The Orlando attorney is part of both worlds: A partner in the law firm Broad and Cassel, he has two sons with autism. He founded the Chamber of Commerce for Persons with Disabilities Inc. two years ago and is now looking to expand the organization’s regional focus to a national one.

The Chamber hopes to be an umbrella organization for groups across the U.S. that promote the disability community and help disabled entrepreneurs get businesses off the ground.

Like more traditional chambers, the group wants to create a place to network. But it will also deal with issues that affect disabled entrepreneurs – such as changing federal contracting programs to include disability businesses.

Rogue Gallart, president of the Central Florida Disability Chamber: “The end result is to get off (Social Security) disability.”

Full Article and Source:
Attorney building chamber for disabled

>Chamber of Commerce for Persons with Disabilities

June 28, 2009

>

Pete Schoemann wants to build a bridge between the business and disabled communities.

The Orlando attorney is part of both worlds: A partner in the law firm Broad and Cassel, he has two sons with autism. He founded the Chamber of Commerce for Persons with Disabilities Inc. two years ago and is now looking to expand the organization’s regional focus to a national one.

The Chamber hopes to be an umbrella organization for groups across the U.S. that promote the disability community and help disabled entrepreneurs get businesses off the ground.

Like more traditional chambers, the group wants to create a place to network. But it will also deal with issues that affect disabled entrepreneurs – such as changing federal contracting programs to include disability businesses.

Rogue Gallart, president of the Central Florida Disability Chamber: “The end result is to get off (Social Security) disability.”

Full Article and Source:
Attorney building chamber for disabled

NASGA Honors Our Nation’s Veterans

May 25, 2009

NASGA
National Association to STOP Guardian Abuse
http://www.stopguardianabuse.org/
http://nasga-stopguardianabuse.blogspot.com/

PRESS RELEASE
For immediate release
May 25, 2009
For more information contact:Annie McKenna
NASGA Media Liaison
info@StopGuardianAbuse.org
_______________________________________________
NASGA Honors Our Nation’s Veterans on Memorial Day…
But Beware and Be Warned! Veterans in Peril
_______________________________________________
Over 30,000 Americans have been injured to date during the current war on terror – a war that may continue for years. Many have returned to service but others have been disabled, some very severely.

Our heroes of past wars also fall victim to unlawful and abusive guardianship / conservatorship, either as a result of disability or advanced age. The numbers continue to grow.

The pirates target our young disabled Veterans – lured by their veteran’s benefits, disability pensions, and now even their Social Security benefits.

Our aging Veterans are even more tempting – perhaps they have well-managed, nice-sized estates to go with their pensions.

After years of service and sacrifice to our country, is this what our Veterans have to look forward to? Denied the very rights and liberties they fought for? Confined in nursing homes, left to languish, receiving perhaps just a pittance for their personal use from their guardians?

Supporting the troops and our fallen heroes should mean supporting them not only when we need them – but also when they need us. And they need us fighting for them when they become vulnerable.

NASGA is a civil rights organization comprised of victims and families working to expose and end unlawful and abusive guardianships/conservatorships.

>NASGA Honors Our Nation’s Veterans

May 25, 2009

>NASGA
National Association to STOP Guardian Abuse
http://www.stopguardianabuse.org/
http://nasga-stopguardianabuse.blogspot.com/

PRESS RELEASE
For immediate release
May 25, 2009
For more information contact:Annie McKenna
NASGA Media Liaison
info@StopGuardianAbuse.org
_______________________________________________
NASGA Honors Our Nation’s Veterans on Memorial Day…
But Beware and Be Warned! Veterans in Peril
_______________________________________________
Over 30,000 Americans have been injured to date during the current war on terror – a war that may continue for years. Many have returned to service but others have been disabled, some very severely.

Our heroes of past wars also fall victim to unlawful and abusive guardianship / conservatorship, either as a result of disability or advanced age. The numbers continue to grow.

The pirates target our young disabled Veterans – lured by their veteran’s benefits, disability pensions, and now even their Social Security benefits.

Our aging Veterans are even more tempting – perhaps they have well-managed, nice-sized estates to go with their pensions.

After years of service and sacrifice to our country, is this what our Veterans have to look forward to? Denied the very rights and liberties they fought for? Confined in nursing homes, left to languish, receiving perhaps just a pittance for their personal use from their guardians?

Supporting the troops and our fallen heroes should mean supporting them not only when we need them – but also when they need us. And they need us fighting for them when they become vulnerable.

NASGA is a civil rights organization comprised of victims and families working to expose and end unlawful and abusive guardianships/conservatorships.

NASGA Honors Our Nation’s Veterans

May 25, 2009

NASGA
National Association to STOP Guardian Abuse
http://www.stopguardianabuse.org/
http://nasga-stopguardianabuse.blogspot.com/

PRESS RELEASE
For immediate release
May 25, 2009
For more information contact:Annie McKenna
NASGA Media Liaison
info@StopGuardianAbuse.org
_______________________________________________
NASGA Honors Our Nation’s Veterans on Memorial Day…
But Beware and Be Warned! Veterans in Peril
_______________________________________________
Over 30,000 Americans have been injured to date during the current war on terror – a war that may continue for years. Many have returned to service but others have been disabled, some very severely.

Our heroes of past wars also fall victim to unlawful and abusive guardianship / conservatorship, either as a result of disability or advanced age. The numbers continue to grow.

The pirates target our young disabled Veterans – lured by their veteran’s benefits, disability pensions, and now even their Social Security benefits.

Our aging Veterans are even more tempting – perhaps they have well-managed, nice-sized estates to go with their pensions.

After years of service and sacrifice to our country, is this what our Veterans have to look forward to? Denied the very rights and liberties they fought for? Confined in nursing homes, left to languish, receiving perhaps just a pittance for their personal use from their guardians?

Supporting the troops and our fallen heroes should mean supporting them not only when we need them – but also when they need us. And they need us fighting for them when they become vulnerable.

NASGA is a civil rights organization comprised of victims and families working to expose and end unlawful and abusive guardianships/conservatorships.

>Can’t Win Independence

May 19, 2009

>

Heather Wade-Moore wants to regain control of her life.

A civilian psychiatrist has certified that the 50-year-old U.S. Army veteran from East St. Louis is competent to handle her own financial affairs after years of battling mental illness and drug addiction.

But now Wade-Moore feels she has another battle to wage: Independence from a fiduciary and guardian appointed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and St. Clair County probate court.

Every month, Wade-Moore receives $3,600 in the form of two payments: a VA disability payment and a Social Security check. The payments go directly to her fiduciary and guardian, Sharon Mehrtens.

Mehrtens pays Wade-Moore’s bills and gives her a monthly allowance of $800.

“She’s not giving me enough money to take care of my home, my family or myself.”

Full Article and Source:
Many wards can’t win independence