Archive for the ‘Law School’ Category

NY Guardian System Needs Fixes and Oversight: Law School Report

December 10, 2012

The state’s system of guardianship for incapacitated individuals is plagued by delays, a lack of resources for poor families and periodic scandals that underscore the need for more accountability, according to a report released Monday [12/3].

The report, by a Cardozo School of Law clinic, has outlined a series of recommendations to help improve the system, including a statewide task force and increased scrutiny of potential guardians. It also suggested that state officials consider alternatives to guardianship that allow incapacitated individuals more control over their own affairs while providing the necessary support.

“Our goal is twofold: to move forward on some of the shorter-term, simpler recommendations and then to create a conversation about some of the bigger picture questions, like creating an alternative to guardianship,” Rebekah Diller, the head of the Cardozo clinic, said in an interview.

Article 81 of the state’s Mental Hygiene Law, passed 20 years ago, created the modern system of guardianship and remains “a model statute” in many ways, according to the report, “Guardianship in New York: Developing an Agenda for Change.”

The statute mandates the least restrictive approach so that an individual is only deprived of those decision-making rights that are necessary to protect them, and courts are required to consider alternatives. In addition, a hearing and an investigation by a court evaluator are required, and the right to counsel is afforded the individual.

“Notwithstanding these important reforms, noteworthy challenges remain two decades later,” the authors wrote.

The recommendations range from systemic reforms, like instituting a statewide data management system to track cases, to relatively small changes, like standardizing guardianship-related forms and making them accessible online.

Perhaps most important, according to the report, is the establishment of a statewide task force on guardianship, a move that Missouri, Ohio and Delaware either are contemplating or have already carried out.

“Without a standing body to identify key policy and practice issues and to coordinate reform implementation, change is not likely to occur,” the report said.

Full Article and Source:
NY Guardian System Needs Fixes and Oversight: Law School Report

See Also:
Read “Guardianship in New York: Developing an Agenda for Change”

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Clinic for Low Income Seniors

March 6, 2009
The law school at Campbell University, slated to relocate from the Buies Creek campus to Raleigh later this year, has announced plans for a clinic catering to low-income senior citizens.

According to Britt Davis, Campbell Law’s development director, the clinic will provide experience for law students while serving senior citizens who otherwise might not be able to afford an attorney. The clinic is scheduled to open in September.

Dubbed the Campbell Senior Law Clinic, the operation will be led by an attorney specializing in elder law, focusing on wills, power of attorney, guardianship, abuse and neglect, consumer fraud and other issues pertinent to seniors. Cases will be generated through referrals and a partnership with Legal Aid of North Carolina.

The clinic is funded in part by a $150,000 gift from Progress Energy.

Source:
Campbell law school plans clinic to help senior citizens

>Clinic for Low Income Seniors

March 6, 2009

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The law school at Campbell University, slated to relocate from the Buies Creek campus to Raleigh later this year, has announced plans for a clinic catering to low-income senior citizens.

According to Britt Davis, Campbell Law’s development director, the clinic will provide experience for law students while serving senior citizens who otherwise might not be able to afford an attorney. The clinic is scheduled to open in September.

Dubbed the Campbell Senior Law Clinic, the operation will be led by an attorney specializing in elder law, focusing on wills, power of attorney, guardianship, abuse and neglect, consumer fraud and other issues pertinent to seniors. Cases will be generated through referrals and a partnership with Legal Aid of North Carolina.

The clinic is funded in part by a $150,000 gift from Progress Energy.

Source:
Campbell law school plans clinic to help senior citizens

>Mini Law School for Public

February 3, 2009

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The Technical College of the Lowcountry is accepting applications for its Law School for Non-Lawyers program, a seven-week course that will explore a variety of legal subjects.

The three-hour, weekly classes will be conducted Feb. 10 to March 24 and are expected to cover a range of topics, including criminal law, bankruptcy, torts, real estate law and juvenile justice.

An attorney volunteered to teach a class in health care and elder law and another on arbitration and meditation.

The course is offered at several technical colleges across the state by the S.C. Bar Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the S.C. Bar Association.

When: 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesdays, Feb. 10 – March 24
Where: Technical College of the Lowcountry, Beaufort Campus, 921 Ribaut Road.
To register: 843-525-8205
or www.tcl.edu/continuing_education/howtoregister.asp


Topics to be covered:
•Feb. 10 –Overview of state courts and alternative dispute resolution
•Feb. 17 — Juvenile justice and child protection hearings
•Feb. 24 — Family law and real estate/landlord-tenant law
•March 3 — Wills, estates and probate; health care and elder law
•March 10 — Employment law and S.C. workers’ compensation law
•March 17 –Bankruptcy law, consumer law and debt collection
•March 24 — Criminal law and torts

Full Article and Source:
Attorneys offer mini-law school for the public